Research

Christian Jurisprudence I

Project Description

A comprehensive analysis of the contributions of modern Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox figures to fundamental questions of law, politics, and society.

Project Accomplishments
  • Roundtable Conferences (1999, 2001, 2003, 2004)
  • January 4-5, 2004 Public Conference (with Christian Law Professors Fellowship); 8 speakers, 150 participants
Sponsors

The Pew Charitable Trusts, Inc. (with co-sponsorship from the University of Notre Dame)

Directors
CSLR Participants
Other Participants
  • Gerard V. Bradley, University of Notre Dame
  • Patrick M. Brennan, Villanova University
  • Angela Carmella, Seton Hall University
  • Davison M. Douglas, College of William and Mary
  • Duncan B. Forrester, New College, University of Edinburgh, Scotland
  • Robert P. George, Princeton University
  • R. Kent Greenawalt, Columbia University
  • David L. Gregory, St. John's University
  • Leslie Griffin, University of Houston
  • Emily Fowler Hartigan, St. Mary's University, San Antonio
  • George Hunsinger, Princeton Theological Seminary
  • Mikhail Kulakov, Carolina Conference of Seventh-day Adventists
  • Paul E. Sigmund, Princeton University

Project Publications

Showing 1-4 of 4
  • Previous
  • 1
  • Next
The Teachings of Modern Christianity on Law, Politics, and Human Nature, Volume I, Columbia University Press, 2005 John Witte, Jr., Frank S. Alexander
The Teachings of Modern Orthodox Christianity on Law, Politics, and Human Nature, Columbia University Press, 2007 John Witte, Jr., Frank S. Alexander
The Teachings of Modern Protestantism on Law, Politics, and Human Nature, Columbia University Press, 2007 John Witte, Jr., Frank S. Alexander
The Teachings of Modern Roman Catholicism on Law, Politics, and Human Nature, Columbia University Press, 2007 John Witte, Jr., Frank S. Alexander
Showing 1-4 of 4
  • Previous
  • 1
  • Next
In Their Own Words

"We need to develop ways to teach families to talk about their individual and shared past together in ways that facilitate adolescent self-understanding and self-esteem. We need to teach families to talk about their negative experiences and their negative emotions in ways that help adolescents learn to manage and regulate their negative affect, rather than to act out on it. These are not difficult concepts; if we can help families to collaboratively construct narratives then we can help families buffer adolescents from the stress and storm of adolescence and help these adolescents to form healthy adult identities. Families build resilience through building stories."

–Robyn L. Fivush