Research

Christian Jurisprudence I

Project Description

A comprehensive analysis of the contributions of modern Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox figures to fundamental questions of law, politics, and society.

Project Accomplishments
  • Roundtable Conferences (1999, 2001, 2003, 2004)
  • January 4-5, 2004 Public Conference (with Christian Law Professors Fellowship); 8 speakers, 150 participants
Sponsors

The Pew Charitable Trusts, Inc. (with co-sponsorship from the University of Notre Dame)

Directors
CSLR Participants
Other Participants
  • Gerard V. Bradley, University of Notre Dame
  • Patrick M. Brennan, Villanova University
  • Angela Carmella, Seton Hall University
  • Davison M. Douglas, College of William and Mary
  • Duncan B. Forrester, New College, University of Edinburgh, Scotland
  • Robert P. George, Princeton University
  • R. Kent Greenawalt, Columbia University
  • David L. Gregory, St. John's University
  • Leslie Griffin, University of Houston
  • Emily Fowler Hartigan, St. Mary's University, San Antonio
  • George Hunsinger, Princeton Theological Seminary
  • Mikhail Kulakov, Carolina Conference of Seventh-day Adventists
  • Paul E. Sigmund, Princeton University

Project Publications

Showing 1-4 of 4
  • Previous
  • 1
  • Next
The Teachings of Modern Christianity on Law, Politics, and Human Nature, Volume I, Columbia University Press, 2005 Frank S. Alexander, John Witte, Jr.
The Teachings of Modern Orthodox Christianity on Law, Politics, and Human Nature, Columbia University Press, 2007 Frank S. Alexander, John Witte, Jr.
The Teachings of Modern Protestantism on Law, Politics, and Human Nature, Columbia University Press, 2007 Frank S. Alexander, John Witte, Jr.
The Teachings of Modern Roman Catholicism on Law, Politics, and Human Nature, Columbia University Press, 2007 Frank S. Alexander, John Witte, Jr.
Showing 1-4 of 4
  • Previous
  • 1
  • Next
In Their Own Words

"Happiness is both a perennial topic and a currently fashionable one, and the relation between some of the current trends in positive psychology and the traditions in philosophy and theology are as yet unclear, so this is an opportune time to take stock and to focus on the topic. What most intrigues me about the "Pursuit of Happiness" project is the way it brings scientists, humanities scholars, and theologians around the same table. The "dialects" that we use in our respective professional worlds are so diverse that our meetings sometimes feel like Babel, or chaos; and some members are a little troubled by that; but its an adventure. Moreover, the usual turf battles that go on within academic fields are completely irrelevant here, which is quite refreshing."

–Philip L. Reynolds