Islamic Legal Studies

Project Description

Explores the relationship between Islam and Shari`a (Islamic law) on the one hand, and law, human rights, constitutionalism, and secularism, on the other, in different parts of the world.


The Ford Foundation


Project Publications

Showing 1-10 of 13
African Constitutionalism and the Role of Islam, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006 Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im
"The Future Contests of Islamic Law and Politics,"October 26, 2007 Baber Johansen, Professor of Islamic Religious Studies, Harvard University
"The Future of Shari'a: Secularism from an Islamic Perspective,"January 29, 2007 Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im
"Globalization and Jurisprudence: An Islamic Perspective," Emory Law Journal, Vol. 54, No. Special Edition (2005): 25-51 Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im
Inter-religious Marriages Among Muslims: Negotiating Religious and Social Identity in Family and Community, Global Media Publications, 2005 Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im
Islam and Human Rights: Advocacy for Social Change in Local Contexts, Global Media Publications, 2006 Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im, Mashood Baderin
Islam and Human Rights, Collected Essays in Law, Ashgate, 2010 Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im
Islam and the Secular State: Negotiating the Future of Shari`a, Harvard University Press, 2008 Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im
"Islamic Law in Britain: A Minor Problem or a Problem for a Minority?,"March 18, 2009 Mona Siddiqui, Professor of Islamic Studies and Public Understanding, and Director of the Centre for the Study of Islam at the University of Glasgow
"The 'Law of Morality' of Human Rights in Islamic Societies,"October 26, 2007 Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im
Showing 1-10 of 13
In Their Own Words

"For me, as a scholar working on the history of sexual ethics, the real question wasn't "What happened then?" but "How does what happened then influence what happens now?" John Witte's invitation to join his project on sex, marriage, and family created the perfect moment for me, because I was ready to enter a much broader conversation about contemporary debates -- legal, political, sociological, medical -- and to connect with what other scholars were doing."

–Mark D. Jordan