Research

Islam and Human Rights Fellowship Program

Project Description

A residential program for scholars and activists from various parts of the Islamic world to explore the relationship between human rights and Islam.

Project Accomplishments
  • 12 roundtable conferences (2001-2004)
  • International Conference, Istanbul, Turkey (May 16-21, 2004)
  • 29 international lectures; 38 national lectures
  • Symposium on "Islam and Human Rights," Journal of Human Rights in the Muslim World
  • Special "From the Field" Issue: "Islam and Human Rights Advocacy for Social Change in Local Contexts," Muslim World Journal in Human Rights
Sponsors

The Ford Foundation

Directors
Other Participants
  • Hameed O. Agberemi, Al-Fataah, Nigeria
  • Ali Ahmad, Bayero University, Nigeria
  • Salbiah Ahmad, human rights attorney, Malaysia
  • Jamila Bargach, National School of Architecture, Morocco
  • Codou Bop, GREFELS, Senegal
  • Siti Ruhaini Dzuhayatin, State Institute of Islamic Studies, Indonesia
  • Jamail A. Kamlian, Mindanao State University-LLigan Institute of Technology (MSU-IIT), Philippines
  • Lily Zakiyah Munir, Center for Pesantren and Democracy Studies, Jombang, Indonesia
  • Huda Seif, anthropologist, Yemen
  • Recep Senturk, Islamic Research Center, Turkey

Project Publications

In Their Own Words

"Happiness is both a perennial topic and a currently fashionable one, and the relation between some of the current trends in positive psychology and the traditions in philosophy and theology are as yet unclear, so this is an opportune time to take stock and to focus on the topic. What most intrigues me about the "Pursuit of Happiness" project is the way it brings scientists, humanities scholars, and theologians around the same table. The "dialects" that we use in our respective professional worlds are so diverse that our meetings sometimes feel like Babel, or chaos; and some members are a little troubled by that; but its an adventure. Moreover, the usual turf battles that go on within academic fields are completely irrelevant here, which is quite refreshing."

–Philip L. Reynolds