Research

Cultural Transformation in Africa: Legal, Theological, and Human Rights Perspectives

Project Description

An exploration of cultural transformation in Africa, with particular emphasis on the improvement of women's rights to and control over land as a vital economic resource and vindication of second generation rights.

Project Accomplishments
  • Roundtable conferences in Atlanta (1996) and in Cape Town, South Africa (1997, co-organized with the Center for African Studies of the University of Cape Town), summarized in  Emory International Law Review 11 (1997): 287-349
  • Women and Land website
  • Islam and Human Rights website
Sponsors

The Ford Foundation

Directors
Other Participants
  • Hussaina J. Abdullah, Nigeria
  • Winnie Bikaako, Uganda
  • Elise-Henriette Bikie, Cameroon
  • Florence Butegwa, Uganda
  • Martin Chanock, La Trobe University, Australia
  • Patrice Bigombe Logo, Cameroon
  • Liazzat Bonate, Mozambique
  • Paulito Angelo Coutinho, Mozambique
  • Gemechu Degefa, Ethiopia
  • Jeffrey Hammond, Emory University
  • Ibrahim Hamza, Nigeria
  • Vasco Filipe Macudo, Mozambique
  • Geunet Meteke, Ethiopia
  • Makau wa Mutua, State University of New York, Buffalo
  • Annie Kairaba, Rwanda
  • John Muyenzi, Rwanda
  • Celestine Nyamu-Musembi, Kenya
  • Akinyi Nzioki, Royal Netherlands Embassy
  • Issa G. Shivji, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
  • John Ssenkumba, Uganda
  • Mouhamadou Sy, Senegal
  • Ngone Diop Tine, Senegal

Project Publications

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"The Contingent Universality of Human Rights: The Case of Freedom of Expression in African and Islamic Contexts," Emory International Law Review, Vol. 11 (1997): 29-66 Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im
Cultural Transformation and Human Rights in Africa, Zed Books, 2002 Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im
Women and Land in Africa: Culture, Religion, and Realizing Women's Rights, Zed Books, 2003 L. Muthoni Wanyeki
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In Their Own Words

"Pointing to the banality of evil does not make humans, nazis or others, less culpable morally. Humans are responsible for the evil they do, regardless of why they do it. They are accountable before humanity and God. ... Pointing to the banality of goodness does not diminish it in any way. An act is good when it is caring, when it protects the life and rights of others, no matter who does it, or where, or why."

–David R. Blumenthal